PR, Community Relations,
Events, Speakers' Bureau,
Marketing for 55+ Older Adults, Seniors, Boomers, and their Families


Charles Kauffman CEO Atty. Ret.     
5101 River Road     
Bethesda MD 20816     
Phone 301-467-9336     
     
charles@kauffman.com     

MARKET FOR SENIORS, NOT TO THEM!

Kauffman.com – Marketing to Seniors #1

KAUFFMAN.COM – MARKET FOR SENIORS, NOT TO THEM!

Charles Kauffman, CEO of Kauffman.com, says ‘the 55+ market embraces seniors, boomers and their families and they have lots of discretionary dollars and fewer obligations”. Almost every type of business or organization will benefit by cultivating this rapidly growing, diverse, multi-segmented, huge audience. They comprise over 12% of the population and consume virtually every type of service and product.

Connecting involves more than traditional public relations and media advertising. Older adults respond to sensitivity, respect and honesty, they need time and attention.  Appealing to them demands a medley of PR, direct marketing, event engagement, advertising and community relations techniques. Kauffman.com places its clients in high- profile, well publicized local and national events and activities. It engages them in coalitions, committees and events where they work with key members of major organizations. Active engagement builds personal friendships and deepens professional relations, heightens public awareness and gains media attention. A well-publicized association with a major organization will also make them more visible and more credible. Kauffman often engages clients as speakers to provide content to create interesting and informative events for seniors. It also uses new internet communications, applications and social networks.

Medium and small business owners don’t have time to manage, sell, and market. They compensate by spending more money on expensive unproductive and unfocussed media advertising and spend valuable time on vacuous networking. Kauffman.com actually reduces their advertising and promotional spending. It creates real credibility, more engagement and makes a positive social and economic impact on them individually and in their communities.

Chuck Kauffman is a senior, and believes that  “it takes one to know one”. He has a strong record of producing real growth for its clients delivering their services, products or mission statements to larger more receptive audiences. They get more bang for their buck and achieve impressive returns. Contact charles@kauffman.com for a brief, free consultation.

 

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THE HUGE ECONOMIC BENEFIT OF 55+ SENIORS, BOOMERS AND OLDER ADULTS

THE HUGE ECONOMIC BENEFIT OF 55+ SENIORS, BOOMERS AND OLDER ADULTS

THE HUGE ECONOMIC BENEFIT OF 55+ SENIORS, BOOMERS AND OLDER ADULTS*                                                                                    by Charles Kauffman, CEO Kauffman.com

The 2010 US Census reported that 119,769 individuals In Montgomery County MD of the populations are 65 or over with 58% being females. By the year 2020, the number of seniors is projected to grow to 156,000, a 30% increase in a ten year span of time. Older adults in the County are less likely to have significant debts. Only 43% are still paying a mortgage, compared to 91% of home owners under 65. Few have young dependents living at home and have no education related or child rearing expenses. They are one or two person households. By and large they are healthy, with major medical expenses covered by Medicare.  Social Security plus some retirement pensions supplement their income.  Estimated per capita income is about $35,000 per year. Although these income levels are lower than the 35-55 age segment, household expenses are lower and therefore disposable income is higher.  Major family and home expenses no longer burden them. Food and energy and gas expenses have risen but excluding them, other cost of living expenses have risen only slightly.  The lag in the housing market has little effect on this segment and 93% are aging or residing in their own homes and are less likely to move.

 The Urban Institute** observed that many in this group have delayed retirement and stay full or part time in the work force.  Keeping active older adults employed, increases tax revenue and contributes to economic growth. Active engagement or employment, decreases social isolation, increases health, personal wealth, tax revenues, lowers costs enhancing businesses’ competitive advantages and strengthens local and state economies.

  The NGA Center*** in Washington DC  noted that even when older adults want to work, volunteer or learn new skills, too many of them do not have connections to opportunities and it offered some suggestions. 

  • Establish public-private partnerships to review the issue of engagement;
  • Increase awareness of the benefits of work, volunteering and education;
  • Create connections between older adults, work, volunteer and education opportunities;
  • Strengthen engagement opportunities in state aging, workforce and education systems; and
  • Encourage employees, public and private, to remain in the workforce longer, reconnect to work after retirement and volunteer.

 The 2010 census estimated that total retail sales in Montgomery County were $13.4 billion and per capita retail spending was above $14,000. Aside from basic expenses like food, gasoline, utilities, car and home insurance we assume that one-half to one-third of older adult income is disposable income – where, why and how do they spend or invest $1.4 billion? How do they spend their spare time?

Can for-profit and non-profit organizations, communicate, engage, benefit and capitalize on this vast economic and labor resource?  Can business and government focus on and appeal to this group? Can society employ this vast army of volunteers productively?  The answer is a conditional- YES!

 The blog entitled, ‘MARKET FOR SENIORS, NOT TO THEM!’ on www.kauffman.com****’ states:

“Connecting involves more than traditional public relations and media advertising. Older adults respond to sensitivity, respect and honesty, they need time and attention.  Appealing to them demands a medley of PR, direct marketing, event engagement, and advertising and community relations techniques. Kauffman.com places its clients in high- profile, well publicized local and national events and activities. It engages them in coalitions, committees and events where they work with key members of major organizations. Active engagement builds personal friendships and deepens professional relations, heightens public awareness and gains media attention. A well-publicized association with a major organization will also make them more visible and more credible. Kauffman often engages clients as speakers to provide content to create interesting and informative events for seniors. It also uses new internet communications, applications and social networks.

Medium and small business owners don’t have time to manage, sell, and market. They compensate by spending more money on expensive unproductive and unfocussed media advertising and spend valuable time on vacuous networking. Kauffman.com has actually reduced their advertising and promotional spending. Marketing for seniors creates real credibility, more engagement and makes a positive social and economic impact on them individually and in their communities.”

 Contact charles@kauffman.com 301 467 9336 with questions, comments or for more information.

 References:

*“THE HUGE ECONOMIC BENEFIT OF 55+ SENIORS, BOOMERS AND OLDER ADULTS” By Charles Kauffman, Esq., www.kauffman.com /blogs

**”CAPITALIZING ON THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF OLDER ADULTS’ WORK””. Eric J. Toder, Richard W. Johnson, Gordon B.T.Mermin and Serena Lei, URBAN INSTITUTE. www.urban.org

*** “MAXIMIZING THE POTENTIAL OF OLDER ADULTS: Benefits to State Economies and Individual Well-Being.” By Linda Hoffman, NGA CENTER FOR BEST PRACTICES, www.nga.org

**** “MARKET FOR SENIORS NOT TO SENIORS”, Charles Kauffman, Esq., www.kauffman.com /blogs

 © 2011 Charles Kauffman

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CROSS- CULTURAL MARKETING- A MUST FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY

CROSS- CULTURAL MARKETING- A MUST FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY

By Charles Kauffman, CEO Kauffman.com

 The 2010 Census indicates that Montgomery County like most of the U.S. is diverse and multi-cultural. It is a succotash of many separate, segmented groups including Multi:  Hispanic, White, Black, Asian, Gay-Lesbian, Seniors, native and foreign born residents and it is peppered with a vast diversity of religions. Each group has its own organization and leadership within the County with some better organized than others.

 The County’s current “specialized” approach attempts to appeal, connect and communicate individually to each diverse group.  While, the effort is noble – that approach won’t work. It is beyond our financial, administrative and marketing capability. 

 A better marketing approach and one that is more likely to succeed would be to appeal to these groups” pan- culturally”.  Focus on marketing County services to wider consumer similarities rather than individual cultural differences.

 Abandon the effort to fashion dozens of individual approaches – leave that job to the leaders of each of the diverse groups. County efforts should focus on finding, defining and focusing on those elements that these groups have in common. Then build programs, communications based on common needs, aspirations and goals which are helpful and meaningful to most or all these groups. The ultimate goal should be to bring these groups to a common place and to find places in common for the County to approach all of them.  

 After defining common elements the County might focus on creating an image – that Montgomery County an attractive place for families to live, work and assimilate into society. Then the County would create goals and aspirations for all which are achievable, “patriotic” and pragmatic.

 

 

 

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PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS – AN IMPERATIVE FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY

PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS – AN IMPERATIVE FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY

By Charles Kauffman, CEO Kauffman.com

Public- Private Partnerships (“PPPs”) represent a valuable means for Montgomery County to leverage resources of many kinds to work collaboratively with public and private partners. Partnerships take many forms and range widely in size and scope. Partnership activities center on the shared goals and mandates of the partners, leveraging knowledge, skills, resources and services to achieve synergy.

 Public- Private Partnerships can be utilized both in times of economic uncertainty and in periods of prosperity. There is a nexus between the public sector’s needs and the private sector’s goals. Local and State governments, particularly in today’s challenging economic times, need to  find innovative ways to provide funding to design, build, finance and operate projects.  While PPP’s proliferate around the globe, most of the emphasis has been on large projects. The purpose of this paper is to focus attention on creating smaller opportunities within Montgomery County to engage partners and actualize projects which are close to our needs. County government can start by outlining and prioritizing   projects and by providing the vision, organization and impetus to engage partners, assess assets, locate sources, and form coalitions between private and public parties. The County should be the leader in forming PPPs to develop projects, operate them and provide the oversight for continued quality assurance.

The PPP activities contemplated, range in scope and size from simple event sponsorship and in- kind volunteer support, to the funding of major capital projects. PPP activities can be as simple as providing funds to print and distribute informational material, to building libraries, schools and recreation centers.  The incentives for private partner participation, pragmatically, will vary with the size of the project. The important thing for the County is to develop PPPs to provide components for activities which have up to now been directly or indirectly funded by tax revenues. Projects created by PPP coalitions will be initiated with more public input resulting in greater use and acceptance. Coalitions will provide economies of scale and can advance causes that are in the public good.

 

In what may be a missed opportunity, the conditions for a meaningful PPP existed in the creation of the new Mid-County Recreation Center which opened on July 9th 2011. The completely furnished eco-friendly building cost the County $18 million with future operational costs also to l be borne by the County. A project of this scope might have included the participation and sponsorship of many PPP participants. Inducements such as “naming rights” and others might have offset some of the initial and long-range costs. There are still ample opportunities within this particular project for some PPP involvement in funding operations and these should be actively pursued by the County.

 

Another, possibility for a PPP exists in the utilization of The Bethesda Theatre, as a Community Arts and Entertainment Center. The County has many other physical needs such as   classroom and administrative space, and recreational facilities.  It might consider volunteers as auxiliary police in schools or library assistants. A County “punch list” would undoubtedly yield viable projects for PPP participation. These need not be capital intense. Simple community informational events and publications have been curtailed by budget constraints. Very few assets would be required to restore these vital programs.

 

Advantage to the County

  • Financial saving
  • Professionally produced projects
  • Future partners
  • Advanced long term goals of providing assets to residents.

 

Advantages to Participating Partners

  • Prestige and influence derived from a working relationship with County Executive, Departments  and Legislators
  • Prestige of working relationships with major nonprofit and business organizations  related to the project
  • Potential working relationships on other State, Regional and National projects
  • New vital relationships and contacts
  • Highly prestigious County endorsement.
  • New business marketing opportunities.

Wider customer base resulting from heightened public awareness

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AGING AT HOME – DOWNTOWN

AGING AT HOME DOWNTOWN – The new option for “Empty Nesters”
An article in the December 2005 AARP Bulletin about “Beacon Hill Village” had profound effects on retirement living. It described an association founded in Boston conceived by Susan McWhinney Morse to enable older adults to “age in place’ rather than moving to senior housing. Essentially it provided the services of assisted living but in your own home. To join and receive needed assistance, you paid a membership fee and receive free or discounted support services in your own home. The key was “one stop shopping”. By calling a “concierge” you could access anything from replacing a light bulb, to advice and assistance with Alzheimer’s. It included a number of necessary services such as household help and homemaking (cleaning, grocery shopping, errands, and meals), personal assistance, companionship, and nursing care plus social, health and cultural activities. The “Village” movement spread throughout the US with many variations, some involving non-dues paying membership, increasing reliance on volunteers, communal housing and more. It is still growing and that is good.
Older adults are showing more flexibility in their choices. The most profound change effecting the “village” – remain in your old home- concept is the increasing desire to move to urban areas. Districts which are doing more to create housing that enhances the lives of empty nesters are thriving.
One of the highest priorities of empty nesters is to live in a neighborhood near their families and friends. Lately more older adults find that high-rise apartments and duplex town houses are “age friendly” offer ease of maintenance, nearby shopping, more convenience, better transportation options, more walkability, Older adults seek homes where there is life, energy and a wealth of choices – more easily accessible. They want the intergenerational mix and they want their independence. They find that living without stairs is safer, maintenance is cheaper, and the need for driving is less, they can get by with one or no cars. A recent article in the Wall Street Journal cites Bethesda as one of the top ten “walkable communities”, as is Arlington, Rockville, Friendship Heights and Tysons.
Jane Jacobs said “the presence of great numbers of people, gathered together in cities should be enjoyed as an asset and their presence celebrated”. Suburbs which have prospered, share the attributes of walkability, vibrant street life, density and diversity with urban neighborhoods. Theresa Brewer put it another way:
When you’re alone
And life is making you lonely,
You can always go downtown.
Government can certainly help … changing zoning and housing regulations to encourage “mixed” commercial and residential use, more open spaces, safer pedestrian cross walks, bikeways, better lighting, more public spaces, more accessible public transportation, greater expansion of “universal design’ concepts, more moderately priced senior housing. Multifamily dwellings increase tax derived revenue for government, maintenance of infrastructure to service multifamily dwellings is less, Medicaid and related care and transportation costs for government are reduced when care is given in a patient’s own home rather than in a nursing facility. Thus government can afford to provide more of the health, recreational and social amenities older adults enjoy.
Government alone cannot create great places to live and grow older – private sector businesses, retailers, developers, academic institutions, health care organizations, social service providers, architects, religious and civic institutions must work together to make downtown neighborhoods more age-friendly. Aging in Place has evolved and the demand for ‘empty nester” housing is rapidly growing. Capitalizing on it involves energetic, pragmatic, public and private collaboration.
Charles Kauffman

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Welcome to Kauffman.com!

Kauffman.com now has a blog that will be used to disseminate information about important events in our community.  Subscribe to the RSS feeds to keep up to date.

Charles

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